The Mind of a Conservator

This conservator is an art loving 20-something year old with a lab coat and nitrile gloves.
artgalleryofontario:

Canadian West Coast Art: Native and Modern exhibition, installed in the E.R. Wood Gallery, January 1928 © 2014 Art Gallery of Ontario

artgalleryofontario:

Canadian West Coast Art: Native and Modern exhibition, installed in the E.R. Wood Gallery, January 1928 © 2014 Art Gallery of Ontario

conservethis:

whitesparrowbindery:

The “Invisible” Box

Like many publisher’s cloth bindings, the textblock of this book was extremely brittle.  A few of the pages in the front of the book had cracked along the inner margin, and were falling out of the book.  Repairing brittle paper can be extremely challenging because it tends to crack along the edge of the repair, causing further damage.

I decided that this book would be better served by a box, which will keep all of the loose pieces together.  Some librarians and collectors dislike boxes because they hide the binding and can turn your bookshelves into a drab wall of identical spines.

To get around this problem, I scanned the spine of the book, and then printed it out on archival paper.  The image of the book’s spine was then adhered to the spine of the box.  When placed on the shelf, it blends in with the other books, making the box “invisible”.

This is a good idea! However, inkjet prints from a regular printer can be prone to fading. The NEDCC has a good guide to creating long-lasting inkjet prints. I’ve also seen this technique used to fill in missing areas of leather or cloth, by scanning a similar area of material on the other board, and printing it out onto kozo or moriki paper. A coat of SC-6000 on moriki paper can create an amazingly effective visual fill for leather.

varnishisapowerfulliquid:

Proud moment: condition reporting and preparing To Prince Edward Island (1965) by Alex Colville for loan to the AGO. [Because I’m originally from PEI and remembering taking the ferry to the mainland. And because Alex Colville is the bomb!]

varnishisapowerfulliquid:

Proud moment: condition reporting and preparing To Prince Edward Island (1965) by Alex Colville for loan to the AGO. [Because I’m originally from PEI and remembering taking the ferry to the mainland. And because Alex Colville is the bomb!]

The Powder Tour at night, Prague.

The Powder Tour at night, Prague.

juan-morato:

Detail : Decent from the Cross. 1435. Rogier Van Der Weyden. Flemish. 1399-1464. oil on canvas. Prado Museum.

juan-morato:

Detail : Decent from the Cross. 1435. Rogier Van Der Weyden. Flemish. 1399-1464. oil on canvas. Prado Museum.

(via artdetails)

conservethis:

whitesparrowbindery:

Beanie Baby Conversion

Soft weights are an essential tool in any bookbinding or book/paper conservation studio.  Talas sells bag weights in a variety of weights, but they can be pricey - 1 lb weights are $12.85 each (plus shipping).

Old Beanie Babies (and who doesn’t have a pile of those lying around) can easily be converted into bag weights that are cute and economical.

1. Start with the Beanie Baby of your choice.  The older style with flat tummies work the best.

2. Use a seam ripper to rip out some of the stitches on the Beanie’s back. I like to start near the tail. (Once I tried opening a Beanie Baby on the seam under his tail and between his legs, but it felt waaaaaaay too creepy).

3.  There is a mesh panel sewn into this spot.  It’s designed to prevent little ones from choking on PVC pellets should the stitching come apart. Cut it out.

4. Empty the PVC pellets out into a bowl.  Don’t worry about getting every last one - you’ll put some back later.  You can leave the stuffing in the head alone.

5. Weigh out your desired amount of shot.  I can find copper coated shot at my local sporting goods store.  I can get four 1 lb weights from one bottle.  I’ve also seen zinc coated shot.  Avoid using uncoated lead shot - you don’t want to get lead poisoning!  I like to use a paper bowl to hold the shot when weighing - I can then fold it on one side to facilitate pouring the shot into the Beanie.

6. Pour the shot into the Beanie.  1 lb of shot takes up less space inside the Beanie than the original PVC pellets, so I like to put some of the pellets back into my little critter so that he feels full.

7.  Here is a batch of refilled Beanie Babies waiting to be sewn up.

8.  Sew up the opening you made using matching thread.  If you’re not a sewer, check out his video on How to Sew a Teddy Bear Closed.

And there you have it - Beanie Baby soft weights!

In my house we used to have “Beanie Baby Wars” where my sister and I would fling them at each other and try to hit one another. I don’t recommend doing that with these babies.

conservethis:

5daysofpreservation:

nyupreservation:

Today in the lab, we’re reviewing highlighted and underlined books to determine whether they need to be replaced or can continue to circulate. The books shown here are so excessively marked up that they will be withdrawn and replaced with new copies. 
And while books that have been marked with pencil can be cleaned up with erasers, the process of evaluating and erasing takes time and staff resources, in addition to keeping the books out of circulation where they belong. 
So please, please, pretty please…don’t write in library books! Take notes on a separate sheet of paper, type notes on your computer, or scan/photocopy the pages you wish to annotate & mark up the copy. Your library’s staff and your fellow patrons will thank you!

Highlighters are evil. More evil than tape.

ಠ_ಠ

There is a special place in hell for people who draw in Library books.

conservethis:

5daysofpreservation:

nyupreservation:

Today in the lab, we’re reviewing highlighted and underlined books to determine whether they need to be replaced or can continue to circulate. The books shown here are so excessively marked up that they will be withdrawn and replaced with new copies. 

And while books that have been marked with pencil can be cleaned up with erasers, the process of evaluating and erasing takes time and staff resources, in addition to keeping the books out of circulation where they belong. 

So please, please, pretty please…don’t write in library books! Take notes on a separate sheet of paper, type notes on your computer, or scan/photocopy the pages you wish to annotate & mark up the copy. Your library’s staff and your fellow patrons will thank you!

Highlighters are evil. More evil than tape.

ಠ_ಠ

There is a special place in hell for people who draw in Library books.

uispeccoll:

Happy Birthday Beatrix Potter!

Today we celebrate the 148th birthday of the famous children’s author, Beatrix Potter, who is mainly known for writing The Tale of Peter Rabbit. Here at the University of Iowa, we are fortunate enough to have a copy of one of the first printings of this charming tale, which according to our acquisition papers, was previously owned by Potter’s niece!

This particular book was printed in a grouping of 250, and is widely believed to have been done so in 1901. However, the acquisition papers accompanying this copy state that the author’s records say it was privately printed in 1900, and later issued in 1901. This copy is also interesting as it contains the later omitted pages showing how Peter Rabbit’s father met his demise by way of pie. 

Want to see the fully digitized version of this book? Click here!

Want to learn more about this and other Beatrix Potter books at Iowa? Click here

-Beatrix Potter aficionado, Lindsay M.

PZ5.P86 T3