The Mind of a Conservator

This conservator is an art loving 20-something year old with a lab coat and nitrile gloves.

We need principles… For permanent display in museums we need guidelines that are appropriate for local conditions

—Sarah Staniforth, the current guidelines have been in place for six years - it is time to move from interim guidelines. (via icom-cc-live)

ummaannex:

Check out this story on The Pageant of the Masters, an event in which a collection of classic and contemporary works are recreated by live people in elaborate stagings. 

We either make ourselves miserable or we make ourselves strong. The amount of work is the same.

—Carlos Castañeda  (via likeafieldmouse)

fyeahwomenartists:

Alicia GalerGreen Hanging Cacti, 2013Watercolor paints/pencils and oil pastels on paper

fyeahwomenartists:

Alicia Galer
Green Hanging Cacti, 2013
Watercolor paints/pencils and oil pastels on paper

installator:

"Egon Schieles ‘Stadtende’ wurde unter enormen Sicherheitsmaßnahmen umgesiedelt. Dafür kam das Kunstwerk in eine speziell klimatisierte Box, in der es ins Joanneumsviertel transportiert wurde. Dort ist es von 26.11.2011-02.09.2012 in der Ausstellung “Moderne. Selbstmord der Kunst” zu bewundern.” (Universalmuseum Joanneum)

icom-cc-live:

After the 2011 terrorist attack in Oslo, complex decisions had to be made regarding the treatment of a damaged tapestry. Ida Areklett Garmann and others had to balance the artist’s intention and what the tapestry now represented to the people of Norway. Some believed that the tapestry should not be treated, as the damage had taken on an important meaning. Yet the conservators wanted the tapestry to be hung, which would not have been possible without treatment. A compromise was made so that the damage was stabilised, but still visible. Opinions were divided: one critic argued that the treatment should have been more restorative — that the damage done to it was unintentional, and that people were projecting a meaning. Other critics affirmed that the visible scars on the tapestry were representative of a tragedy, and Norway’s potential to recover from it. 
- Dominic King.

icom-cc-live:

After the 2011 terrorist attack in Oslo, complex decisions had to be made regarding the treatment of a damaged tapestry. Ida Areklett Garmann and others had to balance the artist’s intention and what the tapestry now represented to the people of Norway. Some believed that the tapestry should not be treated, as the damage had taken on an important meaning. Yet the conservators wanted the tapestry to be hung, which would not have been possible without treatment. A compromise was made so that the damage was stabilised, but still visible. Opinions were divided: one critic argued that the treatment should have been more restorative — that the damage done to it was unintentional, and that people were projecting a meaning. Other critics affirmed that the visible scars on the tapestry were representative of a tragedy, and Norway’s potential to recover from it.
- Dominic King.

Do methods of assessment accurately reflect the priorities of teaching?

Jane Henderson and Phil Parkes
deconstruct the ‘aspects of assessment’.

These aspects include standards of practical work - an integral component to conservation masters programs. The grading of each aspect provides visual data.

- Meg Ellis

(via icom-cc-live)

cemeteryconservation:

I was called to a local church to look at a mold issue. They were only worried about the plaster and I pointed out these three paintings that were literally dripping with condensation. The poor over looked panels are warped and heavily molded. Ed and I removed them and put them in a plastic make shift tent on racks with descant. Once they dry out I will vacuum what I can then send them off to a paintings conservator.   

icom-cc-live:

Apryl Morden from the Centre for Cultural Materials Conservation presents her PhD research on authenticating art in a legal framework. There have only been two cases concerning problematic art that have been successfully tried in a criminal court in Australia.

Authentication needs to function in a climate where litigious action (resulting from economic impairment) is the probable outcome. 

The moral right and copyright of artists exists within a grey area - in a legal context, Morden argues for a code of ethics that drive both copyright and moral rights in art authentication cases. Morden examines the codes of ethics provided by the AICCM and calls for greater transparency of information to govern authentication in the 21st century. Understanding best practice in art authentication in a conservation context is integral, particularly when examining moral rights and copyright of artists to ensure integrity and authority.

icom-cc-live:

Apryl Morden from the Centre for Cultural Materials Conservation presents her PhD research on authenticating art in a legal framework. There have only been two cases concerning problematic art that have been successfully tried in a criminal court in Australia.

Authentication needs to function in a climate where litigious action (resulting from economic impairment) is the probable outcome.

The moral right and copyright of artists exists within a grey area - in a legal context, Morden argues for a code of ethics that drive both copyright and moral rights in art authentication cases. Morden examines the codes of ethics provided by the AICCM and calls for greater transparency of information to govern authentication in the 21st century. Understanding best practice in art authentication in a conservation context is integral, particularly when examining moral rights and copyright of artists to ensure integrity and authority.

So you think you want to work in a museum...

whenyouworkatamuseum:

A couple of months ago, I asked you guys to help me crowd-source a museum-career-advice column. Several times a week, I get emails from people who want to work in a museum asking me how to get their foot in the door, or how to succeed in a museum career, so I thought a crowd-sourced advice column…